My Investing Journey with Passive Income and Stock Market investing

Category: Bonds Page 1 of 4

JUNE PASSIVE INCOME & MY PORTFOLIO

HERE IS MY JUNE BREAKDOWN

  • Adsense $4.96
  • Amazon Affiliate $2.82
  • Skillshare $9.21
  • Digital Products $24.50
  • Patreon $76.81 (Before Taxes)
  • Teachable $9.21
  • Dividends $12.33
  • Dividends in retirement accounts $101.21
  • Swing trading $37.06

TOTAL PASSIVE INCOME (NOT COUNTING RETIREMENT) $197.35

TOTAL PASSIVE COUNTING RETIREMENT DIVIDENDS $298.56

Some notable improvements, last month I had ZERO Digital Products and Amazon Affiliate income. So even though they are small amounts, it is a positive movement. Patreon, like last month, continues to be the outperforming. My swing trades for the month include ROKU and FACEBOOK, both over an 8% return.


My DIVIDEND BREAKDOWN:

Putnam Municipal Income CEF (PMM) $.26

Marten Transport $0.20

Genpact $1.46

HOFT $10.40

In my Traditional IRA:

IEF $.61

SWK $11.04

Kforce $2.20

Cash $0.01


MY PORTFOLIO

The MAIN thing I’m doing is contributing more and more into ITOT (A total market ETF). I am also selling small portions of VALUE/DIVIDEND stocks like Westrock, Medical Properties Trust, and American Eagle Outfitters.

I want to increase my positions in growth stocks like Chewy, Fortinet, Akamai, and Marten Transportation.

I’m also buying small portions of the gold ETF, IAU. I think Gold still has a little bit more to run before another pullback.

QQQ ETF is Fantastic | My Portfolio

The two main ETF’s I’m buying this month are QQQ and ITOT. QQQ is weighted towards the Nasdaq and technology. I think during this Coronavirus crash, weighing heavier towards technology is a wise move. So far, it has paid off quite well.

I just added $400 to my ROTH IRA and $500 to my Traditional IRA. In addition to the above ETF’s, I’m also buying these individual stocks-Universal Forest Products and Chewy. I am up over 25% in Chewy, it is of course a growth stock. Chewy is a company that specializes in pet foot delivery. We use their services and see Chewy boxes all around us via our neighbors each week.

In this video, I discuss these ETF’s and bring you my dividend report SO FAR for the month of June **More Dividends to come!**


So far, my DIVIDENDS are as follows:

Stanley Black & Decker $11.04, IEF $0.61 for a total of $11.65 in my TRADITIONAL IRA

PMM $0.61 in my BROKERAGE. Lots more DIVIDENDS to come in this account!

In my ROTH IRA, VBILX $6.77

I’m FINALLY able to add to my accounts this month, so, I’m looking forward to watching that money grow in the market.

I am currently sitting at 6%; one of my short-term goals is to get my total market ETF’s/Index Funds up to 25%. I also want to continue increasing my position in Chewy, Universal Forest Products, Marten Transports, and Fortinet. I feel strongly that these stocks are going to GROW big over the next few years.

Lastly, I’ll briefly mention my Swing Trade for the month. I am swing trading ROKU. This won’t be a long-term hold for me, I’m simply looking for a 8% gain. I am sitting at 2% right now, holding a bit longer. Update later!

Investing Lessons I’ve learned the last 2 years

1)Buy and Hold is a great strategy but not ALWAYS the best strategy. I have had serious winners (up 30%) turn to losers (down 30%) in a hurry. I held on because I believed in buy and hold. Meanwhile, I would have been better off to take some off the table. I ALWAYS take a bit off the table every other quarter or so. This provides a psychological benefit of “winning” as well 🙂


2)Check a companies BOND RATINGS. This has become even more evident during the recent Coronavirus Crash. You are seeing companies that have paid dividends for decades have to cut their dividend. Many of these companies were downgraded to Junk and downgraded again. Look to see the standing of the bonds of the company you are investing in. Use the Moody’s website, create a free account. You can do this research quite easily for most large-cap stocks.


3)Check companies’ EARNINGS in detail. If you see the earnings dropping quarter to quarter over the course of a year or more, it may be time to get on another horse. These companies are not growing. It doesn’t matter if they pay a dividend if your TOTAL RETURN is seriously negative. Buy companies with some growth, whose revenues and earnings are increasing.

4)Debt/Equity Ratio-Once again, the Coronavirus Crash is showing just how important this is. If the company is overleveraged, in hard times like this, it will not be able to meet it’s debt. Invest in companies with PLENTY of cash and reasonable debt levels.


5)Don’t over diversify-I think one issue I had with my portfolio initially is simply too many positions to keep up with. Ideally, I’d like 20 at the most, maybe even 15 really good ones. You don’t HAVE to own every sector with individual stocks if you already have a good index fund.

6)Don’t fall for the P/E trap. What I mean is, just because something has a low P/E, does NOT mean it is undervalued. First and foremost, it is ridiculous to believe the rest of the investing world can’t look at a P/E number and ascertain whether it’s valued appropriately…..so yeah, it’s most likely “priced in.” Not all sectors have the same P/E values, tech can have higher P/E values. Companies on their last leg can have very low P/E numbers but that doesn’t make them undervalued.


7)Don’t forgo BONDS-Luckily, I never had this problem but it bears repeating. I often see people tell younger investors you don’t need to use bonds/bond funds. I think this is ridiculous. One of the reasons my IRA and Roth aren’t down as bad as they could be is because of the bonds. They have a HUGE purpose in a portfolio.

8)”Cash is Trash”. A famous investor recently said that and I know I’m taking it out of context but cash is DEFINITELY not trash. Cash is SUPER important and should be conserved so when a buying opportunity comes along, you can take advantage of it. One thing I did wrong last year is I just kept buying, all the time. Then, when I had lower prices, I didn’t have enough cash to buy. NEVER AGAIN! I think I want to have 10% of my portfolio in cash going forward. Get the money in the market but also don’t just throw it all in at once.


9)Cut losers QUICKER. That is right, when a company drops 20%, maybe it’s time to sell. Not always but sometimes. Personally, I’ve found when I get a quick drop like that I almost always come out better if I just sell. Have a game plan, once you lose a certain percentage, get out. Do not mindlessly use a buy and hold approach, reassess the situation.

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